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Mi-a placut si va spun si voua.


Kristian K
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Cu un pic de inspiratie, m-am gandit la un topic unde putem impartasi cu ceilalti, ceea ce am vazut/gasit/citit/gandit si ne-a placut. :)

De exemplu, mie mi-a placut mult filmuletul asta:

 

 

 

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First contact

We knew about the planet called Earth for centuries before we made contact with its indigenous species, of course. We spent decades studying them from afar.

The first researchers had to fight for years to even get a grant, of course. They kept getting laughed out of the halls. A T-Class Death World that had not only produced sapient life, but a Stage Two civilization? It was a joke, obviously. It had to be a joke.

And then it wasn’t. And we all stopped laughing. Instead, we got very, very nervous. 

We watched as the human civilizations not only survived, but grew, and thrived, and invented things that we had never even conceived of. Terrible things, weapons of war, implements of destruction as brutal and powerful as one would imagine a death world’s children to be. In the space of less than two thousand years, they had already produced implements of mass death that would have horrified the most callous dictators in the long, dark history of the galaxy. 

Already, the children of Earth were the most terrifying creatures in the galaxy. They became the stuff of horror stories, nightly warnings told to children; huge, hulking, brutish things, that hacked and slashed and stabbed and shot and burned and survived, that built monstrous metal things that rumbled across the landscape and blasted buildings to ruin.

All that preserved us was their lack of space flight. In their obsession with murdering one another, the humans had locked themselves into a rigid framework of physics that thankfully omitted the equations necessary to achieve interstellar travel. 

They became our bogeymen. Locked away in their prison planet, surrounded by a cordon of non-interference, prevented from ravaging the galaxy only by their own insatiable need to kill one another. Gruesome and terrible, yes - but at least we were safe.

Or so we thought.

The cities were called Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the moment of their destruction, the humans unlocked a destructive force greater than any of us could ever have believed possible. It was at that moment that those of us who studied their technology knew their escape to be inevitable, and that no force in the universe could have hoped to stand against them.

The first human spacecraft were… exactly what we should have expected them to be. There were no elegant solar wings, no sleek, silvered hulls plying the ocean of stars. They did not soar on the stellar currents. They did not even register their existence. Humanity flew in the only way it could: on all-consuming pillars of fire, pounding space itself into submission with explosion after explosion. Their ships were crude, ugly, bulky things, huge slabs of metal welded together, built to withstand the inconceivable forces necessary to propel themselves into space through violence alone.

It was almost comical. The huge, dumb brutes simply strapped an explosive to their backs and let it throw them off of the planet. 

We would have laughed, if it hadn’t terrified us.

Humanity, at long last, was awake.

It was a slow process. It took them nearly a hundred years to reach their nearest planetary neighbor; a hundred more to conquer the rest of their solar system. The process of refining their explosive propulsion systems - now powered by the same force that had melted their cities into glass less than a thousand years before - was slow and haphazard. But it worked. Year by year, they inched outward, conquering and subduing world after world that we had deemed unfit for habitation. They burrowed into moons, built orbital colonies around gas giants, even crafted habitats that drifted in the hearts of blazing nebulas. They never stopped. Never slowed.

The no-contact cordon was generous, and was extended by the day. As human colonies pushed farther and farther outward, we retreated, gave them the space that they wanted in a desperate attempt at… stalling for time, perhaps. Or some sort of appeasement. Or sheer, abject terror. Debates were held daily, arguing about whether or not first contact should be initiated, and how, and by whom, and with what failsafes. No agreement was ever reached.

We were comically unprepared for the humans to initiate contact themselves.

It was almost an accident. The humans had achieved another breakthrough in propulsion physics, and took an unexpected leap of several hundred light years, coming into orbit around an inhabited world.

What ensued was the diplomatic equivalent of everyone staring awkwardly at one another for a few moments, and then turning around and walking slowly out of the room.

The human ship leapt away after some thirty minutes without initiating any sort of formal communications, but we knew that we had been discovered, and the message of our existence was being carried back to Terra. 

The situation in the senate could only be described as “absolute, incoherent panic”. They had discovered us before our preparations were complete. What would they want? What demands would they make? What hope did we have against them if they chose to wage war against us and claim the galaxy for themselves? The most meager of human ships was beyond our capacity to engage militarily; even unarmed transport vessels were so thickly armored as to be functionally indestructible to our weapons.

We waited, every day, certain that we were on the brink of war. We hunkered in our homes, and stared.

Across the darkness of space, humanity stared back.

There were other instances of contact. Human ships - armed, now - entering colonized space for a few scant moments, and then leaving upon finding our meager defensive batteries pointed in their direction. They never initiated communications. We were too frightened to.

A few weeks later, the humans discovered Alphari-296.

It was a border world. A new colony, on an ocean planet that was proving to be less hospitable than initially thought. Its military garrison was pitifully small to begin with. We had been trying desperately to shore it up, afraid that the humans might sense weakness and attack, but things were made complicated by the disease - the medical staff of the colonies were unable to devise a cure, or even a treatment, and what pitifully small population remained on the planet were slowly vomiting themselves to death.

When the human fleet arrived in orbit, the rest of the galaxy wrote Alphari-296 off as lost.

I was there, on the surface, when the great gray ships came screaming down from the sky. Crude, inelegant things, all jagged metal and sharp edges, barely holding together. I sat there, on the balcony of the clinic full of patients that I did not have the resources or the expertise to help, and looked up with the blank, empty, numb stare of one who is certain that they are about to die.

I remember the symbols emblazoned on the sides of each ship, glaring in the sun as the ships landed inelegantly on the spaceport landing pads that had never been designed for anything so large. It was the same symbol that was painted on the helmets of every human that strode out of the ships, carrying huge black cases, their faces obscured by dark visors. It was the first flag that humans ever carried into our worlds.

It was a crude image of a human figure, rendered in simple, straight lines, with a dot for the head. It was painted in white, over a red cross.

The first human to approach me was a female, though I did not learn this until much later - it was impossible to ascertain gender through the bulky suit and the mask. But she strode up the stairs onto the balcony, carrying that black case that was nearly the size of my entire body, and paused as I stared blankly up at her. I was vaguely aware that I was witnessing history, and quite certain that I would not live to tell of it.

Then, to my amazement, she said, in halting, uncertain words, “You are the head doctor?”

I nodded.

The visor cleared. The human bared its teeth at me. I learned later that this was a “grin”, an expression of friendship and happiness among their species. 

“We are The Doctors Without Borders,” she said, speaking slowly and carefully. “We are here to help.”

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Acum 48 minute, Grigore Dolghin a spus:

First contact

We knew about the planet called Earth for centuries before we made contact with its indigenous species, of course. We spent decades studying them from afar.

The first researchers had to fight for years to even get a grant, of course. They kept getting laughed out of the halls. A T-Class Death World that had not only produced sapient life, but a Stage Two civilization? It was a joke, obviously. It had to be a joke.

And then it wasn’t. And we all stopped laughing. Instead, we got very, very nervous. 

We watched as the human civilizations not only survived, but grew, and thrived, and invented things that we had never even conceived of. Terrible things, weapons of war, implements of destruction as brutal and powerful as one would imagine a death world’s children to be. In the space of less than two thousand years, they had already produced implements of mass death that would have horrified the most callous dictators in the long, dark history of the galaxy. 

Already, the children of Earth were the most terrifying creatures in the galaxy. They became the stuff of horror stories, nightly warnings told to children; huge, hulking, brutish things, that hacked and slashed and stabbed and shot and burned and survived, that built monstrous metal things that rumbled across the landscape and blasted buildings to ruin.

All that preserved us was their lack of space flight. In their obsession with murdering one another, the humans had locked themselves into a rigid framework of physics that thankfully omitted the equations necessary to achieve interstellar travel. 

They became our bogeymen. Locked away in their prison planet, surrounded by a cordon of non-interference, prevented from ravaging the galaxy only by their own insatiable need to kill one another. Gruesome and terrible, yes - but at least we were safe.

Or so we thought.

The cities were called Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the moment of their destruction, the humans unlocked a destructive force greater than any of us could ever have believed possible. It was at that moment that those of us who studied their technology knew their escape to be inevitable, and that no force in the universe could have hoped to stand against them.

The first human spacecraft were… exactly what we should have expected them to be. There were no elegant solar wings, no sleek, silvered hulls plying the ocean of stars. They did not soar on the stellar currents. They did not even register their existence. Humanity flew in the only way it could: on all-consuming pillars of fire, pounding space itself into submission with explosion after explosion. Their ships were crude, ugly, bulky things, huge slabs of metal welded together, built to withstand the inconceivable forces necessary to propel themselves into space through violence alone.

It was almost comical. The huge, dumb brutes simply strapped an explosive to their backs and let it throw them off of the planet. 

We would have laughed, if it hadn’t terrified us.

Humanity, at long last, was awake.

It was a slow process. It took them nearly a hundred years to reach their nearest planetary neighbor; a hundred more to conquer the rest of their solar system. The process of refining their explosive propulsion systems - now powered by the same force that had melted their cities into glass less than a thousand years before - was slow and haphazard. But it worked. Year by year, they inched outward, conquering and subduing world after world that we had deemed unfit for habitation. They burrowed into moons, built orbital colonies around gas giants, even crafted habitats that drifted in the hearts of blazing nebulas. They never stopped. Never slowed.

The no-contact cordon was generous, and was extended by the day. As human colonies pushed farther and farther outward, we retreated, gave them the space that they wanted in a desperate attempt at… stalling for time, perhaps. Or some sort of appeasement. Or sheer, abject terror. Debates were held daily, arguing about whether or not first contact should be initiated, and how, and by whom, and with what failsafes. No agreement was ever reached.

We were comically unprepared for the humans to initiate contact themselves.

It was almost an accident. The humans had achieved another breakthrough in propulsion physics, and took an unexpected leap of several hundred light years, coming into orbit around an inhabited world.

What ensued was the diplomatic equivalent of everyone staring awkwardly at one another for a few moments, and then turning around and walking slowly out of the room.

The human ship leapt away after some thirty minutes without initiating any sort of formal communications, but we knew that we had been discovered, and the message of our existence was being carried back to Terra. 

The situation in the senate could only be described as “absolute, incoherent panic”. They had discovered us before our preparations were complete. What would they want? What demands would they make? What hope did we have against them if they chose to wage war against us and claim the galaxy for themselves? The most meager of human ships was beyond our capacity to engage militarily; even unarmed transport vessels were so thickly armored as to be functionally indestructible to our weapons.

We waited, every day, certain that we were on the brink of war. We hunkered in our homes, and stared.

Across the darkness of space, humanity stared back.

There were other instances of contact. Human ships - armed, now - entering colonized space for a few scant moments, and then leaving upon finding our meager defensive batteries pointed in their direction. They never initiated communications. We were too frightened to.

A few weeks later, the humans discovered Alphari-296.

It was a border world. A new colony, on an ocean planet that was proving to be less hospitable than initially thought. Its military garrison was pitifully small to begin with. We had been trying desperately to shore it up, afraid that the humans might sense weakness and attack, but things were made complicated by the disease - the medical staff of the colonies were unable to devise a cure, or even a treatment, and what pitifully small population remained on the planet were slowly vomiting themselves to death.

When the human fleet arrived in orbit, the rest of the galaxy wrote Alphari-296 off as lost.

I was there, on the surface, when the great gray ships came screaming down from the sky. Crude, inelegant things, all jagged metal and sharp edges, barely holding together. I sat there, on the balcony of the clinic full of patients that I did not have the resources or the expertise to help, and looked up with the blank, empty, numb stare of one who is certain that they are about to die.

I remember the symbols emblazoned on the sides of each ship, glaring in the sun as the ships landed inelegantly on the spaceport landing pads that had never been designed for anything so large. It was the same symbol that was painted on the helmets of every human that strode out of the ships, carrying huge black cases, their faces obscured by dark visors. It was the first flag that humans ever carried into our worlds.

It was a crude image of a human figure, rendered in simple, straight lines, with a dot for the head. It was painted in white, over a red cross.

The first human to approach me was a female, though I did not learn this until much later - it was impossible to ascertain gender through the bulky suit and the mask. But she strode up the stairs onto the balcony, carrying that black case that was nearly the size of my entire body, and paused as I stared blankly up at her. I was vaguely aware that I was witnessing history, and quite certain that I would not live to tell of it.

Then, to my amazement, she said, in halting, uncertain words, “You are the head doctor?”

I nodded.

The visor cleared. The human bared its teeth at me. I learned later that this was a “grin”, an expression of friendship and happiness among their species. 

“We are The Doctors Without Borders,” she said, speaking slowly and carefully. “We are here to help.”

Misto, din ce nuvela/roman e? 

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Ca tot a venit vorba de cum ne batem joc de ce ne-au lasat mostenire parintii si bunicii: un prieten este mecanic de locomotiva. Si din cand in cand pleca la Ruse sa aduca ceva locomotive.

In Bulgaria, la aia cu cefa lata de tot radem de ei, terasamentul este curtat de vegetatie si aranjat frumos. In Ro cand intra omul, nu se vedea terasamentul de vegetatie, si vedea omul cum se lasa sinele in fata locomotivei, si 15-20 m  in fata lui se ridicau sinele si eventual mai sarea cate un surub. 🤦‍♂️ Circula cu 5-10km/h ca ii era frica nu faca vreo nefacuta cu locomotiva.

 

Cam asa ne-am batutu joc de munca si pana la urma de sacrificiile parintilor si buncilor nostri. Si mai vine cate un dobitoc care ne povesteste de oculta mondiala si planul ideo-masonic-blabla de distrugere a Romaniei.

 

Nu am un film despre o patanie cu animalele de pe langa casa, nu mi-a trecut prin cap sa salvez inregistrarea din DVR: intr-o zi a avut motanul o problema cu o pisica de prin vecini, si nu stiu ce fel de mieunat a scos dar instantaneu cei doi caini au sarit - unul din curte si celalalt din casa - sa apere/ajute motanul. Pisica invadatoare nu a stat pe ganduri si a fugit cand au aparut cainii. Bine, mai ales cand a venit Yoyo de 2 kile juma s-a speriat si a fugit :crack:

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Acum 9 minute, Silver Arrow a spus:

Ca tot a venit vorba de cum ne batem joc de ce ne-au lasat mostenire parintii si bunicii: un prieten este mecanic de locomotiva. Si din cand in cand pleca la Ruse sa aduca ceva locomotive.

In Bulgaria, la aia cu cefa lata de tot radem de ei, terasamentul este curtat de vegetatie si aranjat frumos. In Ro cand intra omul, nu se vedea terasamentul de vegetatie, si vedea omul cum se lasa sinele in fata locomotivei, si 15-20 m  in fata lui se ridicau sinele si eventual mai sarea cate un surub. 🤦‍♂️ Circula cu 5-10km/h ca ii era frica nu faca vreo nefacuta cu locomotiva.

 

Cam asa ne-am batutu joc de munca si pana la urma de sacrificiile parintilor si buncilor nostri. Si mai vine cate un dobitoc care ne povesteste de oculta mondiala si planul ideo-masonic-blabla de distrugere a Romaniei.

Zi-mi si mie exact cum "ne-am batut noi" joc de munca si sacrificiile parintilor si bunicilor? Ai fost cumva in conducerea tarii? In parlament? Eu unul nu am fost, nu am avut putere de decizie, deci zi-mi si mie cum anume ne-am batut joc? Vorbim de plural aici? O sa vii sa zici ca nu am votat? Ba am fost la vot, si? Pleaca PSD, vine mini-PSD si tot asa... Deci zi-mi si mie cum anume ne-am batut joc noi ca nu inteleg?

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6 minutes ago, Silver Arrow said:

planul ideo-masonic-blabla de distrugere a Romaniei

Prin vaccinare? Scuze, nu m-am putut aptine. :)

 

6 minutes ago, Silver Arrow said:

Cam asa ne-am batutu joc de munca si pana la urma de sacrificiile parintilor si buncilor nostri

Discutie lunga si cu multiple finaluri.

De ex. eu pot sa zic ca mi-am batut joc de eforturile alor mei de a ma face om cand m-am tatuat si am facut 2 facultati dar am un salariu de rahat si nici n-am reusit sa plec din orasul in care am copilarit; dar ei ca si alti parinti cu siguranta ca au trecut prin destule neajunsuri ca sa-mi fie mie bine/mai bine. Si ce s-a ales?

Dar sacrificiile parintilor nostri se reflecta si in ce zicea Valentin, ca n-o sa putem da noi cu var ce a facut taxu. In 2021 traim intr-o tara rebut, fata de ce au realizat inaintasii nostri.

Sacrificiile lor se pot socoti terfelite si fiindca au muncit cinstit si mult iar acum pensia nu le ajunge nici de medicamente.

Etc.

Scuze pt OFF

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27 minutes ago, SenorPink said:

Deci zi-mi si mie cum anume ne-am batut joc noi ca nu inteleg?

Se zice că "paza bună trece primejdia rea".

Aplicaţie: când năvălesc lupi din pădure în stână ... dispare brânza (şi oile - asta se ştie).

Când năvălesc ţărani din sate în industrie ce dispare?

CAP-ul  :D

Nu?

 

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Acum 34 minute, SenorPink a spus:

Zi-mi si mie exact cum "ne-am batut noi" joc de munca si sacrificiile parintilor si bunicilor? Ai fost cumva in conducerea tarii? In parlament? Eu unul nu am fost, nu am avut putere de decizie, deci zi-mi si mie cum anume ne-am batut joc? Vorbim de plural aici? O sa vii sa zici ca nu am votat? Ba am fost la vot, si? Pleaca PSD, vine mini-PSD si tot asa... Deci zi-mi si mie cum anume ne-am batut joc noi ca nu inteleg?

Ai avut vreun moment in viata in care ai dat spaga ca sa nu platesti o amenda la Politie sau sa nu iti ia carnetul? Ai dat spaga ca sa rezolvi ceva peste rand sau mai repede decat o poate face omul de rand? Ai dat spaga ca sa poti inscrie copilul la gradi sau la scoala? Te-ai bagat vreodata in fata altora la medic sau oriunde in alta parte pentru ca ''aveai un prieten''?  Ai folosit telefonul sau masina de serviciu in interes personal, cheltuielile cu acestea fiind decontate de catre firma (ele se numesc lin limbaj multinational ''bonus-uri'', doar ca in tarile civilizate platesti impozite pe aceste ''bonus-uri'')? Ai parcat vreodata pe spatiul verde, distrugand-ul? ..................

Si lista poate continua, eventual o poti completa si tu.

Daca ai facut ceva atunci esti si tu precum noi toti parte la ruinarea acestei tari. Runiare sociala, morala, economica, cum vrei tu.

 

De ce suntem cu totii vinovati? Pai pentru ca acuma 3 ani am fost doar 100.000 la Piata Victoriei, dintre care cei mai multi din diaspora.

Si atunci practic mesajul transmis celor din conducerea tarii a fost: e in regula, furati in continuare, si noi pe langa voi.  Daca ieseau 1.000.000 de oameni, mesajul era: suntem cu ochii pe voi si daca continuati cu furaciunile venim peste voi.

 

Pasivitatea este o forma de participare, de aceea am pus ''ne-am batut joc''.

 

Nu contest cu nu ai cu cine vota, ca PSD=PNL=USR+=UDMR=AUR= borfasi. Din acest motiv participarea sau nu la vot nu este esentiala cel putin in RO.

 

Cand intrebi un roman cum o mai duce, care este raspunsul de baza? iti spun eu: ''ma descurc''.

 

Cat timp ramanem descurcareti si smecheri, acestea doua calitati fiind la nivel de virtute, inseamna sa ne batem joc de noi insine si de tara pe care ne-au lasat-o parintii si bunicii.

 

Gata, ca am deviat rau de tot.

 

Scuze pentru off-topic  @Kristian K,  dar filmuletul tau este un exemplu atata de frumos despre ce inseamna sa avem grija unul de altul cand traiam in aceeasi batatura, chiar cand suntem diferiti.

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Acum 8 minute, Silver Arrow a spus:

Ai avut vreun moment in viata in care ai dat spaga ca sa nu platesti o amenda la Politie sau sa nu iti ia carnetul? Ai dat spaga ca sa rezolvi ceva peste rand sau mai repede decat o poate face omul de rand? Ai dat spaga ca sa poti inscrie copilul la gradi sau la scoala? Te-ai bagat vreodata in fata altora la medic sau oriunde in alta parte pentru ca ''aveai un prieten''?  Ai folosit telefonul sau masina de serviciu in interes personal, cheltuielile cu acestea fiind decontate de catre firma (ele se numesc lin limbaj multinational ''bonus-uri'', doar ca in tarile civilizate platesti impozite pe aceste ''bonus-uri'')? Ai parcat vreodata pe spatiul verde, distrugand-ul? ..................

Si lista poate continua, eventual o poti completa si tu.

Daca ai facut ceva atunci esti si tu precum noi toti parte la ruinarea acestei tari. Runiare sociala, morala, economica, cum vrei tu.

 

Da pot sa raspund cu mana pe inima ca nu am facut nimic din cele de mai sus. Inca de cand mi-am luat permisul la 18 ani nu am dat spagi!! Si valabil si la doctor si peste tot. 

Acum 8 minute, Silver Arrow a spus:

De ce suntem cu totii vinovati? Pai pentru ca acuma 3 ani am fost doar 100.000 la Piata Victoriei, dintre care cei mai multi din diaspora.

Si atunci practic mesajul transmis celor din conducerea tarii a fost: e in regula, furati in continuare, si noi pe langa voi.  Daca ieseau 1.000.000 de oameni, mesajul era: suntem cu ochii pe voi si daca continuati cu furaciunile venim peste voi.

 

Am fost si acolo si erau mult mai multi de 100k, majoritate nu diaspora ci localnici. Iti zic pentru ca am stat pana la final

 

 

Si hai sa nu mai folosim pluralul cu ne-am batut joc, tara a ajuns asa din cauza noastra. Nu, tara a ajuns asa din cauza astora de au pus mana pe ea si care au preluat fraiele dupa 89. 

 

 

 

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Revenind la ideea topicului,o serie ce mi-a placut foarte mult.Doi englezi au venit in Ro cu avionul,au cumparat o Dacie 1310 break si au plecat pe roti cu ea,asa cum era la cumparare,pana in UK:

 

 

:)

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Dorele lasa topicul curat.La fel va rog si pe ceilalti.

Multamn fain! :)

 

Revenind din nou la subiectul topicului:

https://ziare.com/stiri/inchisoare/motocicleta-detinuti-inchisoare-aiud-ingineri-1691008

 

Unii stiu de ea,altii nu. :)

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Acum 17 minute, Kristian K a spus:

Dorele lasa topicul curat.La fel va rog si pe ceilalti.

Multamn fain! :)

 

Revenind din nou la subiectul topicului:

https://ziare.com/stiri/inchisoare/motocicleta-detinuti-inchisoare-aiud-ingineri-1691008

 

Unii stiu de ea,altii nu. :)

Am avut ocazia sa vizitez memorialul durerii și să văd moto live.

Un loc în care citind ce scrie pe acele bannere informative in funcție de camera și ce este expus, multe sentimente te încearcă în același timp.

IMG_20191015_150857.jpg

IMG_20191015_150848.jpg

IMG_20191015_150857.jpg

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